More Natural, Vegan-Friendly: Trailhead Modern Source Protein is Here!

As the nutrition and supplementation industries continue to evolve, more and more fitness enthusiasts are considering vegetarian or vegan diets. While there are some interesting points to consider about making such a change, one thing is obvious: Traditionally produced whey protein products — key staples in the diets of bodybuilders, lifters and protein-conscious dieters — don’t fit the vegan lifestyle. Whey, obviously, counts as an animal byproduct.

This is why we’re happy to announce that we’re now carrying a great-tasting vegan protein with no artificial sweeteners, no gluten, no GMOs, no artificial colors, no artificial flavors and no allergens! Let us introduce Trailhead Nutrition Modern Source Protein.

This is a huge win for us, and for anyone who wants to go in a more “natural” direction with their diet. If you have been taking expensive veggie proteins like RAW, than you need to try this! It comes in Vanilla and Chocolate, and actually tastes good!

Here is the rundown from Trailhead:

MODERN SOURCE PROTEIN by Trailhead Nutrition offers a great alternate for consumers who are willing to give Rice and Pea Protein Isolates a try and see for themselves.

Comprised of not only these new isolates, but with the addition of two other proteins (Potato and Cranberry), this protein is sure to have consumers trading up or adding to their current protein regiment. MODERN SOURCE PROTEIN is a great alternative or addition to your current protein regiment.
Do not be fooled by inferior vegan protein supplements that utilize Pea Protein Concentrate or Rice Protein Concentrate as their sources of protein

Until recently, Whey and other Dairy based protein powders have been the preferred choice as far as protein supplements go, and one of the only options in the industry for helping athletes and fitness minded individuals get the extra protein they need.
This was true because for many years, one of the only other readily available alternatives to dairy based protein has been Soy, and with some of the more recent studies deterring consumers who may have soy allergies or are trying to eliminate soy from their diet, many have not had much of a choice.
Now, while these are still a great source of protein, and are without a doubt the most popular to date, they are not the only ones being used by consumers today. Two of the newest proteins to hit the market in recent years have been Rice Protein Isolate and Pea Protein Isolate. Some of the studies behind the combination of these two proteins have in many cases shown results similar to those who consume Whey and Dairy based protein powders. Plus, it is a great option for consumers who want to take a break every now and then from their current proteins to get away from any issues that may be experienced by those with dairy allergies. Modern Source Protein is made with NO artificial flavors, NO artificial sweeteners, NO artificial colors, and is Gluten free, Allergen free and NON-GMO.

What is Paleo, and Is It Right For You?

Like any fad, craze, rage or whatever you want to call it, the Paleolithic Diet — aka, “eating paleo,” the Caveman Diet or the Stone Age diet — deserves a closer look before everyone decides to just jump on board. It might seem hard when all your friends seem to be posting Facebook photos of their food, or selfies in the mirror, talking about how awesome “going paleo” has been for them, but let’s break it down a bit further to see its benefits and whether or not this is one fad diet that has some sticking power.

First off: It’s not all that new! The paleo diet’s been around since the ’70s. That said, the basis for its proposed road to success is what matters, not whether it’s an upstart trend. Paleo, ground down to its basic form, is this: Specific, naturally occurring foods with little to no processing, and a highlight on avoiding grains and simple carbohydrates.

The benefits are definitely there: Lots of lean meat for building and maintaining muscle, plenty of healthy fats found from fish and other sources like nuts, and a limit on carbohydrates that we’ve seen do a number on body fat. And of course, the complete omission of sugars — linked to heart disease, diabetes and myriad other illnesses and health problems — is a good thing.

Now, here is where it can be problematic — paleo also doesn’t allow for dairy, a critical source of calcium that simply is hard to find elsewhere. Bone density and strength rely on calcium fortification from the diet, and without dairy products, risks like osteoporosis become much more significant. The thought might be that hunter-gatherers didn’t farm, so they didn’t have access to animal milk or grains, and therefore they were leaner and stronger physically than our average human today. This, of course, doesn’t take into account that all that hunting and gathering consumes quite a few calories, and that technology at that time was severely limited, so much so that it’s impossible to say whether dairy or grains would have adversely affected humans in the stone age.

U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of the paleo diet in a 2012 article don’t shed a particularly favorable light on it, mostly because of the lack of research behind it:

Experts took issue with the diet on every measure. Regardless of the goal—weight loss, heart health, or finding a diet that’s easy to follow—most experts concluded that it would be better for dieters to look elsewhere.

Like any fad, craze, rage or whatever you want to call it, the Paleolithic Diet — aka, “eating paleo,” the Caveman Diet or the Stone Age diet — deserves a closer look before everyone decides to just jump on board. It might seem hard when all your friends seem to be posting Facebook photos of their food, or selfies in the mirror, talking about how awesome “going paleo” has been for them, but let’s break it down a bit further to see its benefits and whether or not this is one fad diet that has some sticking power.

First off: It’s not all that new! The paleo diet’s been around since the ’70s. That said, the basis for its proposed road to success is what matters, not whether it’s an upstart trend. Paleo, ground down to its basic form, is this: Specific, naturally occurring foods with little to no processing, and a highlight on avoiding grains and simple carbohydrates.

The benefits are definitely there: Lots of lean meat for building and maintaining muscle, plenty of healthy fats found from fish and other sources like nuts, and a limit on carbohydrates that we’ve seen do a number on body fat. And of course, the complete omission of sugars — linked to heart disease, diabetes and myriad other illnesses and health problems — is a good thing.

Now, here is where it can be problematic — paleo also doesn’t allow for dairy, a critical source of calcium that simply is hard to find elsewhere. Bone density and strength rely on calcium fortification from the diet, and without dairy products, risks like osteoporosis become much more significant. The thought might be that hunter-gatherers didn’t farm, so they didn’t have access to animal milk or grains, and therefore they were leaner and stronger physically than our average human today. This, of course, doesn’t take into account that all that hunting and gathering consumes quite a few calories, and that technology at that time was severely limited, so much so that it’s impossible to say whether dairy or grains would have adversely affected humans in the stone age.

U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of the paleo diet in a 2012 article don’t shed a particularly favorable light on it, mostly because of the lack of research behind it:

Experts took issue with the diet on every measure. Regardless of the goal—weight loss, heart health, or finding a diet that’s easy to follow—most experts concluded that it would be better for dieters to look elsewhere.

Stay tuned this week for more on the paleo diet, including the gluten-free aspect and how exercise actually muddles up the argument FOR paleo.


Gluten-Free and Paleo

Two highly popular diet trends, the paleo diet and gluten-free eating, go hand in hand, with the latter fitting in to the principles of the former. To skip gluten entirely has more research behind it, due to extensive studies showing that this particular diet (the emphasis is against wheat and other grains) is the only way to manage celiac disease. A side effect of treating celiac this way is, not remarkably, a loss in body fat and decreased risk of diabetes, not to mention more stable blood sugar levels.

In this particular case, taking on the paleo diet will almost assuredly help one lose body fat — by eliminating simple carbohydrates (sugars, white potatoes, etc.), the paleo dieter is actually doing what Atkins and South Beach dieters have done for years, and something we’ve backed repeatedly on this site: lowering excess blood sugar by keeping processed, refined, or simple carbohydrates to an absolute minimum.

But the gluten-free aspect of paleo dieting takes things a step further — it eliminates ALL wheat products, whole-grain or not. For the record, it is completely possible to have non-wheat bread (rice flour), avoid pasta and stick to nature’s more advanced, healthy carbs — brown and wild rice, oatmeal and sweet potatoes, for example. It just can be immeasurably difficult to do this for those who do not  have celiac disease; it’s basically undergoing a type of treatment for a disease you don’t actually have.

That said, the pros and cons of gluten-free eating, with the constraints of the paleo diet, are worth discussing. On one hand, you almost certainly will lose body fat (particularly if you are training hard) quickly; some Nutrishop clients have reported seeing noticeable gains after just a couple weeks of skipping whole-wheat bread. On the other, you’d miss out on important, recovery-aiding carbs that, when timed properly, can be the difference between you making your muscle gains or falling short. And there’s also ketosis — a state in which the body, depleted of glucose, instead starts to produce ketones from healthy fatty acids, eventually even using necessary fatty acids from the brain to provide energy. Eventually, this process turns to deplete muscle stores as well; some familiar with ketosis try to manipulate it and induce it, under control, with volatile carb consumption.

What do you think? Does gluten-free, paleo dieting sound right for you?


Exercise’s Role for Paleo Dieters

Because paleo is so popular with groups of people who tend to lean toward a more active lifestyle, it may be easy to lump it together with Crossfit-style training, marathoners and other endurance athletes. This wouldn’t be totally accurate — distance runners, in particular, often will “carbo-load” to make sure they have the blood sugar necessary for sustained energy. Sports drinks like Gatorade have made their fortunes on replenishing athletes’ glucose levels during exercise, as well.

Paleo, with its high protein and fat levels and minimal carbohydrate allowances, makes for quite the underwhelming diet for athletic and exercise purposes, then. The body’s preferred form of energy is carbohydrates, and when it’s deprived of them, it prefers to burn muscle first (because it’s the most calorically expensive body mass to maintain), and body fat last. That order can be circumvented with a good BCAA supplement, but it still leaves the body ill-equipped for performance.

This leaves the paleo diet lacking in this area — while the exclusion of simple sugars means improved overall health, the high protein content helps build muscle and the increase in healthy fats and fiber can mean fat loss, the complete avoidance of slow-burning carbohydrates — even naturally occurring ones — promotes a more aesthetic benefit than an athletic one.


The Verdict: Who is Paleo For?

After examining some of the characteristics of the paleo diet, it’s easy to see that anyone who needs to lose body fat — or even just body mass — might benefit from the paleo diet, though as an athlete’s diet, it is not recommended because of its lack of slow-burning carbohydrates that could provide valuable energy and recovery value.

It is important to remember why cavemen might have been so lean — if indeed that is the goal in taking on the paleo diet — and it’s because they were 1) hunter-gatherers, often expending massive energy stores in search of food, and 2) largely underfed, since meat  in those days was famously hard to acquire, and even harder to keep without our modern storage conveniences. Fruit and vegetables didn’t keep as long as they do today, which meant more hunting and gathering. And, let’s face it: If cavemen could have farmed, they would have, and if they knew to harvest grains and turn it to bread, which would have been notably easier than hunting a mammoth, they probably would consider it.

Cavemen aren’t great role models, but they are a good example of how one should approach dieting. Eat fresh, whole foods, keep calorie intake within reason and limit sugar intake, all while getting plenty of exercise, and a lean body isn’t so far fetched. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

Fill in the Gaps in Your Gluten-Free Diet with Daily Essentials

A balanced diet can be a bit tricky when you cut out the gluten — you’re saying goodbye to many carbohydrates, which isn’t a bad thing, but some fiber and assorted vitamins and minerals can get cut out along the way. To be sure, if you have celiac disease or want to maintain a leaner figure, it’s worth it, but why not have the best of both worlds?

The human body needs essential vitamins and nutrients, and many of them it cannot produce on its own (in fact, “essential” means it must come from a dietary source). Organ health, immune function, digestion and more rely on a wide spectrum of nutrition. Here is the Daily Essentials line, recommended for achieving this and, of course, GLUTEN-FREE:


Nature’s Fuel

A complete, high potency blend of Vitamins, Minerals, Amino Acids, Antioxidants, Greens and Immune Supporting Nutrients!


Nature’s Greens

Supercharged Whole Food Concentrate, Produced from over 60 Nutrient-Dense Superfoods.


Nature’s Fruits

Supercharged Whole Food Concentrate, Produced from over 40 Nutrient-Dense Superfoods.


Nature’s EFA

The most complete, sophisticated blend of Omega 3, 6 and 9 Essential Fatty Acids available with an added High-grade extract of Sesamin!

Let Us Build Your Gluten-Free Diet

Any time you make a major dietary change, things are bound to be complicated: What can you eat? What can’t you eat? What effect will it have on your body?

Make no mistake, opting to go gluten-free is a major change, but we can help take some of the guesswork out of it. Every NUTRISHOP employee is a certified nutrition specialist, and one of the best services we provide is our meal plans, ALWAYS FREE with purchase.

You saw our list from the Mayo Clinic yesterday on foods not to eat — you might be wondering what exactly you CAN eat, then, and it’s true, it’s a long list. Gluten is an extremely prevalent ingredient in many common foods. Rather than stress over it, or even worse, risk eating a food you might have thought was gluten-free but wasn’t, let us do the work.

We’ll sit down with you and go over every meal, giving you examples and recommendations on how you can replace gluten in your diet with healthier, safer options. No more mindless snacking, no more uninformed eating — NUTRISHOP can give you the knowledge you need to make gluten-free work for you.